AFPWM positively impacts our philanthropic community by connecting and educating people and organizations to practice ethical and effective fundraising.

AFPWM positively impacts our philanthropic community by connecting and educating people and organizations to practice ethical and effective fundraising.

Reset, revive, refresh - Breathing new life into face to face fundraising

posted Monday, September 19, 2016 by Katie Hop

At its best, an encounter with a F2F fundraiser will roughly go like this…  Fundraiser and prospect will acknowledge each other as equals, people with valid opinions, values and priorities. In the conversation that follows, the fundraiser will make an honest and genuine case for regular support which, having asked any questions or discussed potential reservations, the prospect will consider carefully before making a decision with which they feel fully comfortable.

This pattern fits with several psychological theoretical frameworks that attempt to explain and predict individual behaviour. So, self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977), the theory of reasoned action (Fishbein, 1980) and the theory of planned behaviour (Ajzen, 1980) all resonate with the pattern described above as they attempt to explain how people might decide to take an action that has a positive effect on the world around them.

However, anyone with real-world F2F experience knows that most interactions don’t play out like this. Biel’s theory of habitual and value-guided purchase behaviour (2005), which examines the conscious and unconscious decision-making processes faced by consumers in relation to ethical purchases, can also help explain how the popularity of F2F raises challenges for its ability to create genuine dialogues. Increasingly, people bring their memories of previous conversations and experience with F2F fundraisers, which can act as a barrier to a genuine dialogue and considered decisions.

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Tagged: donor relations